Lenten Reading: Finally Going to Read Augustine’s ‘Confessions’

After sitting on my shelf for two years, I have decided to finally crack open and finish Saint Augustine’s famous epic, Confessions. Augustine’s story of leaving his young life of hedonism and debauchery behind after making a monumental conversion to Christianity is a tale many people–especially millennials–find beckoning.

Learning about the scandalous and sinful early lives of saints offers hope. It proves that saints are not born saints and that we all have the ability to become saints no matter what one’s past is. It’s a hope that no one can take away no matter the situation.

The same curiosity leads many to read Thomas Merton’s Seven Storey Mountain which is another tale of a man preoccupied with finding one fleeting high after another before uncovering the truth in life, converting to Catholicism and becoming a Trappist monk.

Heaven is filled with converted sinners of all kinds, and there is room for more.
-St. Joseph Cafasso

If memory serves, Confessions is on the list of The 100 Greatest Books Ever Written, a secular list. The book is considered by both Christians and many non-Christians alike to be a masterpiece. Peter Kreeft calls Augustine a “saint of our times” because of how so many lost millennials are able to relate with his life as a teenager and young adult.

I was torn between three books to take up this Lent…all of which are already on the bookshelf: Confessions, CS Lewis’ Surprised by Joy, or St. Francis de Sales’ Introduction to the Devout LifeIn partial help due to respected recommendation of a priest friend of mine, I think Confessions will be a fine choice! I’m sure there’s more to come on this…maybe a TSP Cliffs Notes? ☩

Advertisements

One thought on “Lenten Reading: Finally Going to Read Augustine’s ‘Confessions’

  1. It’s been on my list, too! Settled on a full reading, cover to cover, of the Catechism of the Catholic Church for Lent, a heavy undertaking. I don’t think Confessions will be far behind, however. First order of business, finish up Imitation of Christ (Kempis) and The Everlasting Man (Chesterton). We’ll let ol’ St. Augustine sit fourth on the list, for now.

    Happy reading!

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s