Pope Francis: “Renewal” of Sacred Music needed after decades of “Mediocrity”

Choir for the papal general audience Nov. 14, 2012, in Paul VI Hall.
Don’t they want more bongo drums in St. Peter’s Basilica?

Ahhhhh, some comments out of the Vatican that don’t require peeking between fingers clenching your face as you read. Speaking to a conference on the 50th anniversary of the document concerning liturgical music following the Second Vatican Council, Musicam Sacramthe Holy Father “recognized that sacred music had often suffered since the Council. Isn’t he right!

Quoting from the Register further:

The instruction set out four types of sacred music: “Gregorian chant, sacred polyphony in its various forms, both ancient and modern, sacred music for the organ and other approved instruments, and sacred popular music, be it liturgical or simply religious.”

In his remarks, Pope Francis highlighted that sacred music has suffered in modernity: “At times, a certain mediocrity, superficiality and banality have prevailed, to the detriment of the beauty and intensity of liturgical celebrations.”

Musicians, composers, conductors and singers in scholae cantorum, he said, “can make a precious contribution to the renewal” of sacred music, he said, while also highlighting the need for “appropriate musical formation” of the faithful, including seminarians, to accompany their contributions.

::golf clap::

Yes, many parishes with…modern…leaning music directors wrongly assume that for their “ministry” to be “relevant” in today’s culture they must imitate either popular music (to horrible and cringeworthy results) or regurgitate protestant hymns frozen in the 70s. Holy Mass is known for inspiring the music of Mozart, Beethovan, and so much more. So why do parishes so rarely use the treasures of our history and Tradition: classical chant, polyphony and instrumentals? It’s like The Metropolitan Museum of Art in NYC only displaying Calvin & Hobbes comic strips…actually, no, it would be like displaying comic strips that no one outside of the museum would ever want to read in on their own time. Show me guitars, maracas, and On Eagles Wings and I will show you a dwindling and unenthusiastic congregation. Show me authentically sacred music, and you will likely find a vibrant congregation full of people of all ages.

Thank you Pope Francis from making even a tiny comment about this issue. ☩

Pope Francis and Confession

Pope Francis has been pictured again not only hearing confessions but making his own confession. His enthusiasm for the power and importance of the sacrament shouldn’t go unnoticed, especially by his…Jesuit-minded…groupies.

During the event and workshop for confessors, the Holy Father said:

In fact, the confessor is called daily to go to the “peripheries of evil and of sin” – this is an awful periphery! And his work represents a genuine pastoral priority. To hear confessions is a pastoral priority. Please, let there not be those notices: “Confessions are heard only on Mondays and Wednesdays from this hour to that hour.” You hear confessions every time they are requested. And if you are there [in the Confessional] praying, keep the Confessional open, which is God’s open heart.

Priests, stop being LAZY and sit in the confessional before, after, and DURING (if possible)…stop this 30-minutes-a-week nonsense. ☩

VIDEO: Jim Gaffigan Discusses Catholicism with Bill Maher on HBO

Jim Gaffigan is a rare species. He’s a celebrity, liked by mainstream popular culture, and is an openly practicing Catholic. Jim is a talented comic who isn’t afraid to talk about the faith that anchors his life with his wife and five children. Despite his humor being family friendly, it doesn’t strike one as being prude or cheesy–he is a classical comic in that he can make everyone laugh.

best-pictures-of-jim-gaffigan

Bill Maher recently invited Jim to be a guest on his show Real Time. Bill is unapologetically atheist and anti-religion. While his show typically deals with politics, he certainly finds time to ridicule the Church. At the same time, he often gets into the mud with less thoughtful liberal guests who blindly and unfairly attack Christianity.

I admit that I find Maher’s HBO show entertaining, intelligent (usually), fair, and humorous. Maher does a good job inviting guests of different backgrounds on his show, engaging them in provocative, yet friendly, debates.

Below is a clip of Gaffigan’s appearance where Bill mentions his Catholicism, joking that, while they’re both comics, they are almost completely different from one another; that they “cancel each other out” on earth. Jim doesn’t have too much time to make his case for Catholicism as I’m sure he would have liked, but it’s fun to see nonetheless. I also laughed out loud at him correcting Bill about “opening for the pope”, saying that actually he opened for the Pope-mobile and that it’s actually the second time he opened for a car.

For a more serious debate on Christianity on Real Time, check out the video below featuring Russ Douthat of the New York Times. If you’re not already familiar with Mr. Douthat, he is a witty, intelligent, funny, and a faithful Roman Catholic.

Follow Russ Douthat on Twitter for frequent thoughts and quips on politics, Catholicism, and popular culture: @DouthatNYT

Cliffs Notes on Pope’s Recent Interview

Just yesterday the Holy Father sat down for an interview with French magazine La Croix for an interview on a wide range of topics covering issues from terrorism, to the role of secular governments, to the SSPX coming into communion with Rome, to Amoris Laetitia. Some particularly notable parts are pasted below but it is encouraged to read the entire text as context is very important with this pope!

– On April 16, you made a powerful gesture by bringing back the refugees from Lesbos to Rome. However, does Europe have the capacity to accept so many migrants ?

Pope Francis : That is a fair and responsible question because one cannot open the gates wide unreasonably. However, the deeper question is why there are so many migrants now.

The initial problems are the wars in the Middle East and in Africa as well as the underdevelopment of the African continent, which causes hunger. If there are wars, it is because there exist arms manufacturers – which can be justified for defensive purposes – and above all arms traffickers. If there is so much unemployment, it is because of a lack of investment capable of providing employment, of which Africa has such a great need. […]

A completely free market does not work. Markets in themselves are good but they also require a fulcrum, a third party, or a state to monitor and balance them. In other words, [what is needed is] a social market economy.

Coming back to the migrant issue, the worst form of welcome is to ‘ghettoize’them. On the contrary, it’s necessary to integrate them.

I am thinking here of Pope Gregory the Great, who negotiated with the people known as barbarians, who were subsequently integrated. This integration is all the more necessary today since, as a result of a selfish search for well-being, Europe is experiencing the grave problem of a declining birth rate. A demographic emptiness is developing.

– The fear of accepting migrants is partly based on a fear of Islam. In your view, is the fear that this religion sparks in Europe justified?

Pope Francis: Today, I don’t think that there is a fear of Islam as such but of ISIS and its war of conquest, which is partly drawn from Islam. It is true that the idea of conquest is inherent in the soul of Islam. […]

Ultimately, co-existence between Christians and Muslims is still possible. I come from a country where they co-habit on good terms. Muslims come to venerate the Virgin Mary and St George.

– How would you characterize a positive form of [separation of church and state]?

Pope Francis: States must be secular. Confessional states end badly. That goes against the grain of History. I believe that a version of [separation] accompanied by a solid law guaranteeing religious freedom offers a framework for going forward. We are all equal as sons of God and with our personal dignity. However, everyone must have the freedom to externalize his or her own faith. If a Muslim woman wishes to wear a veil, she must be able to do so. Similarly, if a Catholic wishes to wear a cross. People must be free to profess their faith at the heart of their own culture not merely at its margins.

The modest critique that I would address to France in this regard is that it exaggerates [separation of church and state]. This arises from a way of considering religions as sub-cultures rather than as fully-fledged cultures in their own right.

– In a secular setting, how should Catholics defend their concerns on societal issues such as euthanasia or same-sex marriage?

Pope Francis: It is up to Parliament to discuss, argue, explain, reason [these issues]. That is how a society grows.

However, once a law has been adopted, the state must also respect [people’s] consciences. The right to conscientious objection must be recognized within each legal structure because it is a human right. Including for a government official, who is a human person. The state must also take criticism into account. That would be a genuine form of [separation of church and state].

You cannot sweep aside the arguments of Catholics by simply telling them that they “speak like a priest.” No, they base themselves on the kind of Christian thinking that France has so remarkably developed.

– What does France mean to you?

Pope Francis: It is the eldest daughter of the Church, but not the most faithful! (Laughs) However, during the 1950s, they also spoke of “France, the mission country.” In that sense, it remains a periphery to be evangelized. However, to be fair to France, the Church there does have a real creative capacity.

France is also a land of great saints, great thinkers […]

– Who is your favorite?

Pope Francis: Saint Therese of Lisieux.

– As elsewhere, the Church in France is experiencing a serious crisis of priestly vocations. How is it possible to manage today with so few priests?

Pope Francis: Korea provides a historical example. That country was evangelized by missionaries from China who later left. Then, for two hundred years, Korea was evangelized by lay people. It is a land of saints and martyrs that now has a strong Church.

So there is not necessarily a need for priests in order to evangelize. Baptism provides the strength to evangelize. And the Holy Spirit, received at baptism, prompts one to go out, to take the Christian message with courage and patience. The Holy Spirit is the protagonist of whatever happens in the Church, its motor. Too many Christians are ignorant of this.

– On April 1, you received Bishop Bernard Fellay, superior-general of the Priestly Fraternity of St Pius X. Is the re-integration of the Lefebvrists into the Church again under consideration?

Pope Francis: In Buenos Aires, I often spoke with them. They greeted me, asked me on their knees for a blessing. They say they are Catholic. They love the Church.

Bishop Fellay is a man with whom one can dialogue. That is not the case for other elements who are a little strange, such as Bishop Williamson or others who have been radicalized. Leaving this aside, I believe, as I said in Argentina, that they are Catholics on the way to full communion.

During this year of mercy, I felt that I needed to authorize their confessors to pardon the sin of abortion. They thanked me for this gesture. Previously, Benedict XVI, whom they greatly respect, had liberalized the use of the Tridentine rite mass. So good dialogue and good work are taking place.

– Would you be ready to grant them the status of a personal prelature?

Pope Francis: That would be a possible solution but beforehand it will be necessary to establish a fundamental agreement with them. The Second Vatican Council has its value. We will advance slowly and patiently.

– You have already convoked two synods on the family. In your view, has this long process changed the Church?

[…] I think that we all came out of the various processes different from the way that we entered. Including me.

In [Amoris Laetitia], I sought to respect the Synod to the maximum. You won’t find canonical prescriptions there about what one may or may not do. […]

It is a serene, peaceful reflection on the beauty of love, how to educate the children, to prepare for marriage…

I think this interview does a pretty good job telling us just where the Holy Father’s head is on some important issues–whether you agree with him or not. I’m happy he did this interview. Please continue praying not only for Pope Francis’s intentions but also for him! ☩