Rereading Mere Christianity – Yet Another Update

As I make my way through the fourth book of C.S. Lewis’ epic Mere Christianity, I find yet another great analogy-filled quote worth sharing (although the entire book is a quote worth sharing).

Good things as well as bad, you know, are caught by a kind of infection, if you want to get warm you must stand near the fire: if you want to be wet you must get into the water. If you want joy, power, peace, eternal life, you must get close to, or even into, the thing that has them. They are not a sort of prize which God could, if He chose, just hand out to anyone. They are a great fountain of energy and beauty spurting up at the very centre of reality. If you are close to it, the spray will wet you: if you are not, you will remain dry. Once a man is united to God, how could he not live forever? Once a man is separated from God, what can he do but wither and die?

Rereading Mere Christianity – Another Update

As I have now declared to the universe, I am rereading Mere Christianity. While the entire book is quotable, I came across another one I thought worth sharing from today:

“Good and evil both increase at compound interest. That is why the little decisions you and I make every day are of such infinite importance. The smallest good act today is the capture of a strategic point from which, a few months later, you may be able to go on to victories you never dreamed of. An apparently trivial indulgence in lust or anger today is the loss of a ridge or railway line or bridgehead from which the enemy may launch an attack otherwise impossible.”

-C.S. Lewis

Rereading Mere Christianity – An Update

As I reread (well, via Audible) Mere Christianity, I am overwhelmed by quotable material. I’d quote the whole thing but then that’d just be the book. I must take this brief moment now to strongly suggest you read (or reread) this book immediately.

Below is a quote I thought particularly good and is something good for EVERY Catholic to keep in mind…especially ones who feel complacent (or even prideful) in their faith.

“The sins of the flesh are bad, but they are the least bad of all sins. All the worst pleasures are purely spiritual: the pleasure of putting other people in the wrong, of bossing and patronising and spoiling sport, and back-biting, the pleasures of power, of hatred. For there are two things inside me, competing with the human self which I must try to become. They are the Animal self, and the Diabolical self. The Diabolical self is the worse of the two. That is why a cold, self-righteous prig who goes regularly to church may be far nearer to hell than a prostitute. But, of course, it is better to be neither.”

-C.S. LEWIS